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Remote Academia is a global Slack-based community that gives faculty and other education professionals a space to share resources and techniques for remote learning.

Join the Remote Academia Workspace!

Start participating in our Slack workspace!

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Connect your own Workspace

Add our shared channel, "#remote-academia-network", to your existing Slack organization.

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What is the Remote Academia community?

Remote Academia is a community that started in response to changes triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic. As many educational institutions moved classes and research online, the need to share resources and work together across institutions became clear, and the Remote Academia community provides a way for that work to occur.

It's a place for sharing ideas and news, discussing techniques and tools, and developing new workflows.

What resources are available on the Remote Academia Slack workspace?

The workspace contains educators' recommendations of tools for course management, videoconferencing, and scheduling. You'll also find discussions of many topics, including changing grading policies, dealing with equity and access concerns, and administering exams.

How should I get started?

If you're new to the Remote Academia community, a good first step is to join the Slack workspace linked above. There, you can introduce yourself to the current members, read past discussions, and start participating in sharing ideas.

What is the Remote Academia shared channel?

Shared channels on Slack are a way to connect two workspaces. The Remote Academia shared channel can be added to any existing Slack workspace, such as one used by your institution or department. The channel is a microcosm of the Remote Academia workspace: discussions, ideas, and best practices.

Who operates the Remote Academia community?

Remote Academia is run by Anne Kohlbrenner, Ross Teixeira, and Shaanan Cohney, all members of the Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton University.

We also run a reading group on issues in education, technology and policy.

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